Health Information

Welcome to the website for www.GoodmanOliphant.info 

You can also directly access the Oliphant family section of the site at:  www.Oliphants.info

I'm including links to health information and resources on this page.

Doug Goodman RN, BSN


OPIOID ADDICTION RESOURCES

Rehab Recovery offers resources for veterans affected by addiction and mental health issues. Contact Rehab Recovery here.

 

 

American Association of Nurse Anesthesists

The Center for Opioid Safety Education has just released a new opioid overdose training video specifically for WA State. This 8-minute video covers overdose risks, the WA State Good Samaritan Law, and a step-by-step demonstration of what to do in an opioid overdose (including rescue breathing and intranasal naloxone). This video is freely available for overdose educators, program staff, pharmacists, first responders, clinicians, schools, etc as a tool in your overdose prevention training.

 You can find the video at: http://stopoverdose.org/section/take-the-online-training/

 

 

STROKE

What is Stroke? Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts (or ruptures). When that happens , part of the brain cannot get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it and brain cells die.

Check out some interesting statistics about stroke.

What are the types of stroke? Stroke can be caused either by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain (called an ischemic stroke) or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain (called a hemorrhagic stroke). A TIA (transient ischemic attack), or "mini stroke", is caused by a temporary clot. What are the effects of stroke? The brain is an extremely complex organ that controls various body functions. If a stroke occurs and blood flow can't reach the region that controls a particular body function, that part of the body won't work as it should. Learn more about how stroke affects the brain.


STROKE WARNING SIGNS

- Face Drooping Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile.

- Arm Weakness Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

- Speech Difficulty Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?

- Time to call 9-1-1 If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately.

- Face Drooping Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile.

- Arm Weakness Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

- Speech Difficulty Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?

- Time to call 9-1-1 If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately.

 

 

HEART ATTACK





HEART ATTACK WARNING SIGNS

Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. 

Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. 

Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. 

with or without chest discomfort.

may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

Learn more about heart attack

CARDIAC ARREST WARNING SIGNS

SUDDEN LOSS OF RESPONSIVENESS

No response to tapping on shoulders.

No response to tapping on shoulders.

The victim does not take a normal breath when you tilt the head up and check for at least five seconds.