Health Information

Welcome to the website for www.GoodmanOliphant.info 

You can also directly access the Oliphant family section of the site at:  www.Oliphants.info

I'm including links to health information and resources on this page.

Doug Goodman RN, BSN


SLEEP RESOURCES


Tuck Sleep
https://www.tuck.com/

 

OPIOID ADDICTION RESOURCES

Rehab Recovery offers resources for veterans affected by addiction and mental health issues. Contact Rehab Recovery here.

American Association of Nurse Anesthesists

The Center for Opioid Safety Education has just released a new opioid overdose training video specifically for WA State. This 8-minute video covers overdose risks, the WA State Good Samaritan Law, and a step-by-step demonstration of what to do in an opioid overdose (including rescue breathing and intranasal naloxone). This video is freely available for overdose educators, program staff, pharmacists, first responders, clinicians, schools, etc as a tool in your overdose prevention training.

 You can find the video at: http://stopoverdose.org/section/take-the-online-training/ 



OPIOID & OTHER REHAB

 RehabSPOT

Get Help Today

(833) 988-0223

 

STROKE

What is Stroke? Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. It is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts (or ruptures). When that happens , part of the brain cannot get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it and brain cells die.

Check out some interesting statistics about stroke.

What are the types of stroke? Stroke can be caused either by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain (called an ischemic stroke) or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain (called a hemorrhagic stroke). A TIA (transient ischemic attack), or "mini stroke", is caused by a temporary clot. What are the effects of stroke? The brain is an extremely complex organ that controls various body functions. If a stroke occurs and blood flow can't reach the region that controls a particular body function, that part of the body won't work as it should. Learn more about how stroke affects the brain.


STROKE WARNING SIGNS

- Face Drooping Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile.

- Arm Weakness Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

- Speech Difficulty Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?

- Time to call 9-1-1 If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately.

- Face Drooping Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile.

- Arm Weakness Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

- Speech Difficulty Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?

- Time to call 9-1-1 If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately.


SLEEP RESOURCES


Tuck Sleep
https://www.tuck.com/


HEART ATTACK




HEART ATTACK WARNING SIGNS

Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. 

Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. 

Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. 

with or without chest discomfort.

may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

Learn more about heart attack

CARDIAC ARREST WARNING SIGNS

SUDDEN LOSS OF RESPONSIVENESS

No response to tapping on shoulders.

No response to tapping on shoulders.

The victim does not take a normal breath when you tilt the head up and check for at least five seconds.


How Genetics Influence Sleep Quality

by Lisa Smalls
April 2019

 In Japan it is a sense of national pride that people function on less sleep than anywhere else on the planet, so it is common to find people napping regularly in public, while in the United States public sleep is an indicator of laziness. In Argentina, kids stay awake well after 10:00 PM, while in Nordic countries it is common to leave children in their strollers outside in the cold while parents drink coffee in the café.   Sleep patterns across the world are as varied as cultures and this has some researchers wondering the influence of genetics on sleep patterns and sleep disorders.  

Environment vs. Genetics  

Sleep is a difficult entity to work with when it comes to genetics and determining whether behaviors are due to environment or genetics. For example, a person living in Japan who takes multiple naps a day, could very well adjust to the American behavior of sleeping longer at night and not napping. This indicates that napping is more of a learned trait that has developed over generations rather than a behavior passed down through genes.   However, current research has begun to link certain sleep disorders to genetic traits. For example, insomnia, which is the second most common mental disorder, was found to have genetic correlation and allowed the researchers to “reveal key brain areas and cells implicated in the neurobiology of insomnia and its related disorders.” While the genetic component of the study was identified, the study was also able to find additional areas of research that made lead to treatment.  

Physiological Processes

Another contributing area of study that may affect genetics and sleep disorders is not so much a direct “sleep disorder gene,” but rather genetic physiological factors that frequently coincide with sleep disorders. Take for example diabetes which is often fraught with sleep disorders which also correlate to obesity. This leads researchers to try and understand how the notion of one physiological process affects another.  

The Circadian Clock  

The Circadian Clock is what regulates the body’s awake and sleep time as well as the body’s internal and external processes around a 24-hour cycle. It has been theorized, especially since the identification of the Circadian gene, that this is a strong area of future study as it focuses on both a person’s sleep cycle—or lack thereof—and a genetic link from parent to child.   In one Circadian-Genetic study researchers worked with twins to measure the four sleep cycles and if they are genetically linked. The results were interesting to say the least as scientists identified all three non-REM related cycles are genetically influenced while REM sleep appears non-genetic.  

Moving Forward  

Sleep is still considered one of the least understood functions in humans and the relationship to genetics and sleep, and more specifically sleep disorders even more so. However, recent findings such as a gene associated with an individual’s circadian clock are now beginning to bare fruit to theories of genetics and the potential link to sleep disorders. So, as research moves forward the questions remain on whether sleep disorders are the result of genetics, environment, or other physiological processes.

Supporting Research:
  
“Genome-wide Analysis of Insomnia (N=1,331,010) Identifies Novel Loci and Functional Pathways”
2018 Jan.
Various Authors

“Genetics of Sleep and Sleep Disorders” 2011 Jul.
Authors: Amita Sehgal and Emmanuel Mignot

“Genetic influences on EEG sleep and the human circadian clock. A twin study.” 1994 Jan.
Author: Linkowski P.  

HEALTHCARE & NURSING CAREER
INFORMATION & RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veteran Support Services:

British Veteran Services:

Rehab 4 Alcoholism

PTSD: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

military ptsd